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I meditate everyday, sometimes twice a day, I can feel the change in my approach towards everything because of it. When I tell people we should meditate to combat the negative things we are dealing it, I don’t think they believe me. Maybe it’s because I didn’t believe it at first, I was fascinated by the concept but I thought yo myself, “how could being still help depression?”. In an article Melania Lizano wrote she answers my question and so much more. Check it out.

Patients usually understand when I recommend meditation to control stress in their lives, even when I prescribe it for anxiety or depression. But when I suggest that my patients learn to meditate to help them lose weight, change bad habits, or deal with disease, they seem surprised. They always ask how meditation could possibly help them deal with things like fibromyalgia, migraines, or chemo treatments, and they surely doubt it could help them control their weight.

But it does.

Although meditation originated as a spiritual practice, with origins dating back thousands of years, its popularity in Western culture is based on its powerful ability to control stress. Today, stress and anxiety are common causes of illness and can lead to chronic disease. Read More

“I was probably 19 when I first came to Hollywood. Eddie Murphy brought me out to do Beverly Hills Cop II and he had a deal at Paramount, so I remember going through the gates of the Paramount lot. He’s in a Rolls-Royce, and he’s not just a star, he’s the biggest star in the world. Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer’s office was in the same building as Eddie’s office, and they would come to work every day with matching cars. Some days it would be the Porsches, and the next day it would be Ferraris. I was like the kid in A Bronx Tale. I got to just hang around when the biggest parts of show business were happening. I was only there a couple of weeks, but I remember every day Jeffrey Katzenberg would call Eddie Murphy — I don’t even know if Eddie was calling him back — but it was like, “Jeffrey Katzenberg called again.” “Janet Jackson just called.” “Michael Jackson called.” It was that crazy. I’ve still never seen anything like it. I had a small part in the movie, but my dream was bigger than that. I wanted to have a convertible Rolls-Royce with a fine girl driving down Melrose blasting Prince.

Now I’m not Murphy, but I’ve done fine. And I try to help young black guys coming up because those people took chances on me. Eddie didn’t have to put me in Beverly Hills Cop II. Keenen Wayans didn’t have to put me in I’m Gonna Git You Sucka. Arsenio didn’t have to let me on his show. I’d do the same for a young white guy, but here’s the difference: Someone’s going to help the white guy. Multiple people will. The people whom I’ve tried to help, I’m not sure anybody was going to help them. Read More

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By now you’ve probably (or not) heard about actress Danielle Watts being approached by police officers about a call they received that her and her boyfriend Brian James Lucas were having sex in their car. There is audio of the incident, and I must say the cop approached them with the upmost respect when asking for ID and informing them why he was there. Danielle Watts refused to ID herself and claimed it was her right to do so. And in a sense she’s right…but not at this moment. The officer had probable cause to do so, and in the state of California where the incident took place the cops can handcuff and detain you if you do not comply. She claims race was the determining factor and she also try to pull the I’m famous bullshit on the cop. The problem I have with this incident is, with all that’s going on in this country in regards to race. This will be the example that closeted racists and Uncle Toms alike will use to point out, that when dealing with “authority” people of color don’t know how to act. Kudos to the officer for keeping his cool. And maybe if Danielle Watts took her head out of her ass, then she’d know that having a white boyfriend and having minor parts in a movie and having a publicist doesn’t mean you’re above the law.

This episode provides an in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker’s monumental public project, “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby” (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY. Seated in her Manhattan studio, Walker explains how the molasses-covered space, along with her extensive research into the history of sugar, inspired her to create a colossal sugar-coated sphinx, as well as a series of life-sized, sugar and resin boy figurines. A team of artists and fabricators are shown constructing and coating the sphinx, which, as Walker says, gains its power by “upsetting expectations, one after the other.” Commissioned by Creative Time, “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby” is the first large-scale public project by Walker who is best known for her cut paper silhouette installations, drawings, and watercolors. “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby” is on view until July 6, 2014. Thereafter, the factory will be demolished to make way for condominiums. Read More

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